Why Is The FDA So Anti-Anal?

Recently an article of mine, “Five Best Condoms For Anal Sex,” gained some traction on our Tumblr site. One of the reasons that it was gaining so much attention was that people were alarmed by the fact that there are no condoms in existence that are FDA approved for anal sex.

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The fact is, every time we mention the possibility of a condom being used for anal sex, we have to add to the disclaimer that it is not recommended nor approved by the FDA. That is a legal issue.

This is what what the FDA’s official website says about the issue:

The Surgeon General (C. Everett Koop, Surgeon General 1982-1989) has said, “Condoms provide some protection, but anal intercourse is simply too dangerous to practice.”

Condoms may be more likely to break during anal intercourse than during other types of sex because of the greater amount of friction and other stresses involved.

Even if the condom doesn’t break, anal intercourse is very risky because it can cause tissue in the rectum to tear and bleed. These tears allow diseases and germs to pass more easily from one partner to the other.

You see, it isn’t the condoms that the FDA disapproves of. It’s anal sex altogether.

Kooper Doesn’t Like the Pooper

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C. Everett Koop was, as the website claims, the US Surgeon General from 1982-1989– during the prime years of the AIDs epidemic. Many cite him with responsibility for the decline in infections and a rise in understanding of the disease. But others think that he is responsible for the negative (and incorrect) view that AIDs/HIV is/was a gay man’s disease– and that it was being spread exclusively through act of anal sex or sharing needles through intravenous drug use.

Koop worked with the religious right to base American sexual education in religious morality– a vast mistake that years and statistics proved was not only incorrect but extremely harmful. His belief that monogamy could fight the spread of AIDs/HIV was especially near-sighted when it’s been proven that condoms are perhaps the most effective method. Unfortunately, many politicians currently in office have taken up Koop’s reigns, and are once again harming far more than they’re helping with their outrageous and outdated views of human sexuality and disease prevention.

The FDA’s Current Ruling

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The fact that the FDA has not reviewed their ruling since, well, before I was born, is frankly absurd. Not only have we had advances in condom technology since then, we’ve also had massive advances in the study of human sexuality, the ways we can keep safe, and the study of the AID/HIV virus itself. We now have drugs that can be taken to prevent contracting the disease– pretty much a morning after pill for AIDs/HIV.

And it’s only going to get better. Hopefully, within the next year, we will start seeing these awesome Origami condoms popping up on the market– and they are the first and only brand we know of that is manufacturing a condom exclusively for anal sex. Why didn’t someone think of this sooner?

Our Take

Condom Depot‘s safer sexperts want you to be safe out there, no matter what kind of sex you’re having or what your sexual orientation is. We advise using condoms during all forms of sex, including anal and oral sex. We advise using condoms in situations where one or the other partners can’t get pregnant and in order to prevent the spread of STDs– including oral and anal sex. We even advise using condoms in situations where you know your partner is clean– some STDs can be had since birth, some are completely asymptomatic in one partner but can be life-threatening for another, and some take a while to show up in tests.

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We know from personal experience and from the studies done in recent years that condoms do prevent the spread of HIV/AIDs. We also know that they can be used safely and effectively during anal sex by taking many of the same precautions that you would use during vaginal or oral sex– wear the right size, use lots of lube, go in slow (and small, especially if it’s your first time), and if need be, go for the extra strength brands.

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Hopefully, we will soon see a change in the FDA’s approval. But for now, remember, it’s always better to be safe than sorry. Wearing a condom correctly will always decrease your chances of catching an STD– even during anal sex

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